San Antonio (Santiago) to Singapore

Overview

Departs Duration Sail From Ship
10th February 2026 42 Nights San Antonio, Chile Volendam
CRUISE LINE Holland America Line

Cruise

Date
Port
Arrive
Depart
10.02.26
San Antonio, Chile
17:00

This large, modern port serves Chile’s capital, Santiago, a city with Spanish colonial charm and a vivacious spirit. Encircled by the Andes and the Coastal Range, Santiago is centered around the Plaza de Armas, with several of the city’s landmarks: the 18th-century Metropolitan Cathedral the Palacio de la Real Audencia from 1808, the City Hall and the National Museum of History. North of San Antonio lie the picturesque old port and university town of Valparaíso and the colorful seaside resort of Viña del Mar. In between the coast and the capital are valleys filled with some of Chile’s most famous wineries, all inviting you to come and taste.

11.02.26
At Sea
12.02.26
At Sea
13.02.26
At Sea
14.02.26
At Sea
15.02.26
Easter Island
08:00
18:00

The imposing stone statues – known as moai – on Easter Island have long fascinated anthropologists (and travelers). Who were the people that carved, moved and erected such giants? What was the statues’ significance? Why did the culture disappear? The statues won t say. Ponder the mysteries yourself on an island tour.

16.02.26
At Sea
17.02.26
At Sea
18.02.26
Adamstown, Pitcairn Islands
08:00

This largely uninhabited island’s rugged cliffs plunge into the blue waters of the South Pacific Ocean. Pitcairn Island is accessible only by boat and has 45 permanent residents. Once there, you can view ancient Polynesian rock carvings, or explore the Court House and church in Pitcairn’s main square, where Fletcher Christian’s Bounty bible is displayed.

19.02.26
At Sea
20.02.26
At Sea
21.02.26
Papeete
08:00

When Captain James Cook first sailed to Tahiti in 1769, he and his crew all thought they’d found paradise. Cook hinted at it in his journals, in coy language that would have been acceptable in his day; his men felt considerably less reserve, and returned home sporting tattoos and stories of a people who ate what fell from trees, and lived lives of freedom unknown in Europe. All without much need for clothes.

Although all of French Polynesia is sometimes referred to as Tahiti, Tahiti proper is only one island, ringed by a reef that turns the water shades of blue even sapphires can’t come near. Rivers flow down from its high peaks, and every night, the sun goes down behind the neighboring island of Moorea, outlining the mountains like a laser show.

Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia, is a bustling business and government center, with black-pearl shops on almost every corner. As you move into the countryside, time starts to slip, and it’s just the changeless ocean and the almost unchanged forests—and much the same sensation that made Cook think he’d found heaven on earth.

22.02.26
Papeete
04:00

When Captain James Cook first sailed to Tahiti in 1769, he and his crew all thought they’d found paradise. Cook hinted at it in his journals, in coy language that would have been acceptable in his day; his men felt considerably less reserve, and returned home sporting tattoos and stories of a people who ate what fell from trees, and lived lives of freedom unknown in Europe. All without much need for clothes.

Although all of French Polynesia is sometimes referred to as Tahiti, Tahiti proper is only one island, ringed by a reef that turns the water shades of blue even sapphires can’t come near. Rivers flow down from its high peaks, and every night, the sun goes down behind the neighboring island of Moorea, outlining the mountains like a laser show.

Papeete, the capital of French Polynesia, is a bustling business and government center, with black-pearl shops on almost every corner. As you move into the countryside, time starts to slip, and it’s just the changeless ocean and the almost unchanged forests—and much the same sensation that made Cook think he’d found heaven on earth.

22.02.26
Bahia d Opunoha
09:00
22:00

Shaped like a heart and crowned with emerald-green spires, Moorea is easy to love. The Magical Island, as it’s nicknamed, is celebrated for its untamed landscape and symmetrical side-by-side bays (called Opunohu and Cook’s); it was said to be the inspiration for the mythical isle of Bali Hai in James Michener’s Tales of the South Pacific. Its languid lagoon seems without end, wrapping this 132-square-kilometer (50-square-mile) isle in shades of liquid blue, from pale aqua to intense turquoise. Dolphins and stingrays glide through the waves alongside snorkelers and divers exploring the stunning undersea scene. Venture inland to the valleys and another aspect of island life becomes clear: agricultural abundance, with crops that include pineapples, bananas, taro, sugarcane, coffee and cotton. Moorea has shopping, too, mainly for lustrous Tahitian black pearls and brightly patterned pareus (wraparound skirts).

Wherever you head, you’ll find the South Pacific you have dreamed of, moving to the leisurely pace of island time. It can be hard to believe Moorea is just 20 kilometers (12 miles) from Tahiti’s bustling capital, Papeete.

23.02.26
Uturoa, Raiatea, Society Islands
08:00
17:00
24.02.26
At Sea
25.02.26
At Sea
26.02.26
At Sea
27.02.26
Crossing the International Date line
28.02.26
NukuAlofa, Tonga
08:00
17:00

Unique in many ways, Tonga is the only country in the South Pacific that has never been colonized. The secret to this tiny kingdom’s lasting autonomy lies with its monarchy – rich in culture and tradition; unafraid to modernize and move forward. You’ll find Nuku’alofa on the isle of Tongatapu – the largest of the 171 island jewels in the Tongan crown. Hopefully the Tongan people, cheerful and welcoming, will treat you to a version of the lakalaka – their compelling art of storytelling manifested in a breathtaking dance.

01.03.26
At Sea
02.03.26
At Sea
03.03.26
Auckland
06:00
21:00

New Zealand’s biggest city deserves more than a layover. Auckland is multicultural and cosmopolitan, with sizeable Polynesian, Asian and Maori populations enriching its history and broadening the palate. Internationally known chefs and fashion designers have made neighborhoods like Ponsonby, Newmarket and Parnell world-class destinations for shopping and dining.

You’re never far from water attractions in New Zealand—and this is especially true in Auckland where it’s not unheard of for downtown workers to go kayaking on their lunch break. The once-gritty port has been transformed into inviting public spaces and buzzing nightclubs, with sailboat charters and regular ferry connections waiting to whisk visitors around the harbor for sightseeing.

Start your day sipping a flat white while you plan your explorations: art gallery crawl, winery tour or volcano hike? It’s possible to do all three without losing sight of the Sky Tower, one of Auckland’s top tourist attractions, from which you can get a bird’s-eye view of the gateway to Aotearoa.

04.03.26
Waitangi (Bay of Islands)
07:00
14:00

Historic sites—including the place where the most important treaty in New Zealand’s history was signed—winemaking, golfing, sailing and scenic beauty all combine to make the Bay of Islands one of this South Pacific nation’s most compelling regions. Located at the top of the North Island, the area has a subtropical microclimate that gives it an abundance of flora and fauna and a lengthy beach season. Comprising 144 islands between Cape Brett and the Purerua Peninsula, the Bay of Islands requires a few days to fully explore. Visitors with just a day here will have to make a tough choice: cultural immersion, nature appreciation or wining-dining-shopping. Waitangi, home to both the cruise port and the region’s historic treaty grounds, is one of three main towns with celebrated sights. The others are Kerikeri, with its historic buildings and vineyards, and Russell, where a notorious seafaring past has mellowed into tidy, day-trip-worthy charm. Those who’d rather experience the Bay of Islands’ breathtaking nature can walk amid majestic kauri trees, descend into glowworm caves or spy on whales and dolphins (or even swim with the latter) in one of New Zealand’s sunniest and most picturesque playgrounds.

05.03.26
At Sea
06.03.26
At Sea
07.03.26
Sydney, Australia
08:00

If you want a snapshot of Australia’s appeal, look no further than Sydney: The idyllic lifestyle, friendly locals and drop-dead natural beauty of this approachable metropolis and its attractions explain why the country tops so many travelers’ wish lists. But Sydney is more than just the embodiment of classic antipodean cool—the city is in a constant state of evolution. A list of what to do in Sydney might start with the white-hot nightlife, with its new cocktail bars and idiosyncratic mixology dens. Inventive restaurants helmed by high-caliber chefs are dishing up everything from posh pan-Asian to Argentine street food, while the famous dining temples that put Sydney on the gastronomic map are still going strong too.

The famed harbor is among the top sights—home to twin icons the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it is the stepping-off point for some of the city’s best cultural attractions and sightseeing. In one day you can sail around the harbor, get a behind-the-scenes tour of the opera house and climb the bridge, with time to spare for people-watching over a flat white at a waterfront café.

Speaking of water, when you plan what to do in Sydney, you will want to include the iconic beaches, where surfers, office workers and tourists alike converge on some of the most gorgeous shoreline scenery anywhere. Bondi, Bronte and Clovelly are all within easy reach of the Central Business District, as is Manly, a charming seaside town located a short ferry ride from Circular Quay. Beyond the city you’ll discover UNESCO World Heritage Sites and the chance to encounter Australia’s cuddliest wildlife—a perfect way to round out your envy-inducing Sydney photo collection.

08.03.26
Sydney, Australia
18:00

If you want a snapshot of Australia’s appeal, look no further than Sydney: The idyllic lifestyle, friendly locals and drop-dead natural beauty of this approachable metropolis and its attractions explain why the country tops so many travelers’ wish lists. But Sydney is more than just the embodiment of classic antipodean cool—the city is in a constant state of evolution. A list of what to do in Sydney might start with the white-hot nightlife, with its new cocktail bars and idiosyncratic mixology dens. Inventive restaurants helmed by high-caliber chefs are dishing up everything from posh pan-Asian to Argentine street food, while the famous dining temples that put Sydney on the gastronomic map are still going strong too.

The famed harbor is among the top sights—home to twin icons the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it is the stepping-off point for some of the city’s best cultural attractions and sightseeing. In one day you can sail around the harbor, get a behind-the-scenes tour of the opera house and climb the bridge, with time to spare for people-watching over a flat white at a waterfront café.

Speaking of water, when you plan what to do in Sydney, you will want to include the iconic beaches, where surfers, office workers and tourists alike converge on some of the most gorgeous shoreline scenery anywhere. Bondi, Bronte and Clovelly are all within easy reach of the Central Business District, as is Manly, a charming seaside town located a short ferry ride from Circular Quay. Beyond the city you’ll discover UNESCO World Heritage Sites and the chance to encounter Australia’s cuddliest wildlife—a perfect way to round out your envy-inducing Sydney photo collection.

09.03.26
At Sea
10.03.26
At Sea
11.03.26
Townsville
08:00
19:00

The Townsville region in North Queensland, Australia is a bustling and vibrant destination boasting diversity in landscape, lifestyle and experiences. Experience barra fishing in the Burdekin or Hinchinbrook, snorkeling fringing reefs around Magnetic Island, scuba diving on the Great Barrier Reef, bird watching at the surrounding wetlands, skydiving The Strand in Townsville, or taking a wagon ride in Charters Towers. With reef, rainforest, outback and wetlands all within easy traveling distance of Townsville, Australia’s spectacular natural wonders await your exploration.
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12.03.26
Cairns(Yorkeys Knob), Australia
08:00
18:00

The gateway to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and the tropical north of the country, Cairns sits on the east coast of the Cape York Peninsula in northern Queensland. This laid-back city is popular with travelers who depart from here for days of sailing, diving, snorkeling and trekking through nearby parks—a celebrated launching pad especially for those who want to explore the reef, the Daintree Rain Forest and other attractions of this part of Queensland. And what better place to start one’s adventure? The residents of Cairns are welcoming, the beach life fantastic and the climate consistently sunny and warm.

Wend your way due east of Cairns, and you’ll find yourself on the Great Barrier Reef, the world’s longest coral reef and also the world’s largest living organism. Famously visible from outer space, it’s often been described as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. The Kuranda Scenic Railway is a different sort of wonder—an engineering marvel from the 19th century that passes through rain forests on UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites before reaching the village of Kuranda. Green Island, a 6,000-year-old coral cay, is an easy day trip from Cairns with opportunities to snorkel and swim; Port Douglas, an hour north of Cairns, is a favorite with visitors thanks to its top-notch restaurants, art galleries and boutiques. Finally, hop on a six-person cable car known as the Skyway Rainforest Cableway for a bird’s-eye view of the stunning natural appeal of the region.

13.03.26
At Sea
14.03.26
Scenic Cruising
15.03.26
At Sea
16.03.26
Darwin, Australia
08:00
18:00

Surrounded on three sides by the turquoise Timor Sea, the Northern Territory’s capital is closer in both distance and temperament to Southeast Asia than it is to most of Australia’s major cities. The lifestyle here is tropical, which means a relaxed atmosphere, balmy weather, fabulous fusion food and vibrant outdoor markets.

This cosmopolitan city has fewer than 140,000 residents, but they include some 50 nationalities. After heavy bombing in World War II and a disastrous cyclone in 1974, Darwin has been largely rebuilt, and it’s modern and well planned. In the downtown area you’ll find everything from great shopping to a crocodile park. You can trace the region’s dramatic history at innovative museums and gallery-hop to see indigenous art. After your sightseeing stroll, have a late lunch at one of the many excellent restaurants. The food options range from authentic Malaysian dishes like laksa, a spicy noodle soup, to a plethora of fresh seafood—mud crab, barramundi and more.

You may find it hard to leave this laid-back lifestyle, but there’s much more to see close by. Darwin is the gateway to two famous national parks, Kakadu and Litchfield, as well as the spectacular Aboriginal-owned Tiwi Islands. Make sure you take the time to “go bush,” as they say in Australia—that is, get out of town and relax. There’s no better place to do it than this glorious part of the country.

17.03.26
At Sea
18.03.26
At Sea
19.03.26
Komodo Island
07:00
14:00

One of more than 17,000 islands that make up the Republic of Indonesia, Komodo Island is most famous for its resident Komodo Dragons. The remnant of a once widespread ancient order of monitor lizards, this giant reptile often measures up to 11 feet in length and can weigh more than 300 pounds. Komodo Island is volcanic in origin, with dramatic landscapes of craggy mountains, deep canyons, savannahs and rain forests. Sample shore excursions: Komodo Island Trek.

20.03.26
Benoa,Bali,Indonesia
07:00

Indonesia is made up of more than 13,000 islands, but even with all that competition, Bali manages to stand out. Beautiful temples and shrines of all sizes are spread across the island, tucked down narrow alleyways, hidden within the jungle or serenely presiding over scenic locations, like the dramatic Pura Tanah Lot atop a rock formation just off Bali’s western coast.

Bali is well known for its arts—traditional music and dance, painting, wood and stone carvings, silver jewelry and ikat and batik textiles. The island’s artistic center is the village of Ubud, and its art markets and boutiques carry beautiful Balinese pieces to take home.

When it comes to dining, whether you’re craving a burrito or satay, you can find a restaurant that serves it. Don’t leave the island, however, without sampling Balinese cuisine. Local cooking, which reflects Chinese and Indian influences, uses blends of aromatic spices to season grilled meats (though not beef—Bali is an island of Hindu culture in mostly Muslim Indonesia), fresh seafood, rice and vegetables with delicious results.

21.03.26
Benoa,Bali,Indonesia
17:00

Indonesia is made up of more than 13,000 islands, but even with all that competition, Bali manages to stand out. Beautiful temples and shrines of all sizes are spread across the island, tucked down narrow alleyways, hidden within the jungle or serenely presiding over scenic locations, like the dramatic Pura Tanah Lot atop a rock formation just off Bali’s western coast.

Bali is well known for its arts—traditional music and dance, painting, wood and stone carvings, silver jewelry and ikat and batik textiles. The island’s artistic center is the village of Ubud, and its art markets and boutiques carry beautiful Balinese pieces to take home.

When it comes to dining, whether you’re craving a burrito or satay, you can find a restaurant that serves it. Don’t leave the island, however, without sampling Balinese cuisine. Local cooking, which reflects Chinese and Indian influences, uses blends of aromatic spices to season grilled meats (though not beef—Bali is an island of Hindu culture in mostly Muslim Indonesia), fresh seafood, rice and vegetables with delicious results.

22.03.26
Crossing the Equator
23.03.26
At Sea
24.03.26
Singapore
08:00

City-states are rare in the present day—and none are quite like Singapore. In the 20th century, the Southeast Asian nation hurtled itself into the modern world, and it continues to expand its state-of-the-art transportation system and build its edgy skyline. Yet Singapore’s urban plan wisely maintained its intimate neighborhoods, many with streets lined with colorful shophouses (a type of building unique to parts of Asia, with businesses located on their ground floors and residences above). Add the city’s mix of ethnic groups—mainly Malays, Chinese and Indians—and you get a vibrant cultural scene that attracts a cosmopolitan, international community.

Singapore’s food scene—which is arguably the world’s most dynamic and runs the gamut from beloved street hawkers to Michelin-starred venues—would merit a trip alone, as would its never-ending shopping options. But the city is also packed with world-class museums, many designed by celebrated architects, and it hosts many major international events, such as the Formula One Grand Prix. Yet only about half of the 720-square-kilometer (278-square-mile) island is developed, which leaves plenty of room for parks and open spaces such as the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, where an old-growth forest still thrives.

Elegant and spacious, Volendam takes her décor cues from the garden. Her grand public spaces are graced with floral fabrics and tapestries, as well as huge vases of fresh floral arrangements. While on board, explore the wonders of nature in BBC Earth Experiences. Enjoy regional cooking demonstrations and food and wine tastings with EXC Port to Table programming. Relax with a spa treatment at the Greenhouse Salon & Spa. Or dine in one of our selection of fine restaurants.

Art Gallery
Atrium
Boutique
Culinary Arts Center
Future Cruise Sales
Laundry Service
Photo Gallery
Reception
Shopping Gallery
Shore Excursion Office

Aerobics
Basketball
Gym
Tennis Court

Card Room
Club HAL
Indoor Pool
Library
Outdoor Pool
The Loft
The Loft and The Oasis

Canaletto Restaurant
Explorations Cafe
Lido Bar
Lido Casual Restaurant
Piano Bar
Pinnacle Grill
Queens Room
Rotterdam Dining Room
Terrace Grill
The Verandah

Beauty Salon
Greenhouse Spa & Salon
Lido Pool
Massage
Sauna
Spa
Thermal Suite
Whirlpool

Crow’s Nest
Dance Floor
Explorers Lounge
Frans Hals Show Lounge
Neptune Lounge
Photo Gallery
Theatre

Cabin

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