Jewels Of The British Isles & South Iceland

Overview

Departs Duration Sail From Ship
13th July 2024 21 Nights Dover, UK Seabourn Sojourn
CRUISE LINE Seabourn

Cruise

Date
Port
Arrive
Depart
13.07.24
Dover, UK
05:00

Crossing the English Channel from continental Europe to Great Britain, the first view of England is the milky-white strip of land called the White Cliffs of Dover. As you get closer, the coastline unfolds before you in all its striking beauty. White chalk cliffs with streaks of black flint rise straight from the sea to a height of 350’ (110 m).

Numerous archaeological finds reveal people were present in the area during the Stone Age. Yet the first record of Dover is from Romans, who valued its close proximity to the mainland. A mere 21 miles (33 km) separate Dover from the closest point in France. A Roman-built lighthouse in the area is the tallest Roman structure still standing in Britain. The remains of a Roman villa with the only preserved Roman wall mural outside of Italy are another unique survivor from ancient times which make Dover one of a kind.

14.07.24
Portland, England
05:30
19:00

Portland Island and the resort town of Weymouth are connected by a 5-mile (8 km) long neck of white sand known as Chesil Beach. Renowned as the finest example of a barrier-type beach in Europe, Chesil Beach was formed 10,000 years ago as glaciers receded and sea levels rose.

The rugged coastline of Dorset and the many attractions in the area are what make Weymouth such a popular vacation destination. The Old Harbour of Weymouth is an excellent Georgian-style harbor and one of the prettiest in Europe. It bustles with activity from large catamarans, fishing boats and yachts. Weymouth Sea Life Adventure Park displays over 1,000 incredible sea creatures including sea turtles, crabs, octopuses and sharks. The nearby Abbotsbury Sub-Tropical Gardens is an impressive walled garden set in 20 acres (8 hectares) of woodland. Portland Island offers stunning views across the Chesil Beach, Portland Harbour, Fleet Lagoon and Weymouth. The little egret, once a rare bird in Britain, is now regularly seen along these shores.

15.07.24
At Sea
16.07.24
Cobh
08:00
18:00

The port town of Cobh is located just 15 miles from Cork, the capital of Ireland’s southern region. Some of Ireland’s more famous landmarks are located in this part of the country, including Blarney Castle, famous for many legends, most notably the magical Blarney Stone. Some of the most beautiful and dramatic scenery in Europe is found west of Cork, with lyrical names to match the picturesque valleys, mountains and coasts.Cork, a city with a heritage reaching into antiquity, is nevertheless modern, well-organized, and well aware of its role as the second city of the Irish Republic. Built on a marsh, and interlaced with winding canals and rivers, the city is divided into two parts, with well-patterned architectural development incorporating the best of the old with the new.

17.07.24
Fishguard
08:00
17:00

Fishguard’s name in Welsh is Abergwaun, meaning the mouth of the River Gwaun. The English name comes from an Old Norse word for a fish trap, and indeed the community has profited from catching and drying herring for centuries. It has remained remarkably unchanged physically over the years. The waterfront has a traditional feel like many others in Pembrokeshire. At first glance, nothing would indicate that this is the site of the last invasion of Britain by a foreign power. But a bicentenary stone recalls the day in 1797 when 1400 French revolutionary troops landed here, only to be routed by the local folk, including a heroic woman shoemaker named Jemima Nicholas, who rounded up more than a dozen dismayed invaders while armed with a pitchfork. A large tapestry depicting the struggle is on display in the Fishguard Town Hall. The surrounding South Wales countryside is dotted with medieval castles, some impressive, such as Pembroke and Picton Castles, and others little more than scenically sited ruins. Cardigan also has a notable garden called Dyffryn Fernant, and St. David’s boasts an impressive early cathedral and a Bishop’s Palace. Prehistoric Pembrokeshire is represented by the Pentre Ifan Burial Chamber, a massive dolmen with an intact 15-ton capstone made of the same type of rock that formed the inner sanctum of Stonehenge.

18.07.24
Douglas Harbour
08:00
18:00

Douglas is the capital of the Isle of Man. Mann, as it is also called, is a British Crown Dependency, with its own parliament and postage stamps (a popular souvenir). Here visitors can sample means of transport ranging from horse-drawn trams, to steam trains and the high-speed motorcycles that compete in the renowned Isle of Man TT races. In summer the town maintains much of the seaside resort charm of an earlier period, including the Victorian-era Grand Union Camera Obscura, now restored for your amusement.

19.07.24
Belfast
08:00
23:00

Belfast, Northern Ireland’s largest urban area is situated on Ireland’s eastern coast. To the northwest, the city is flanked by hills, including Cavehill, thought to be Jonathan Swift’s inspiration for his novel, “Gulliver’s Travels.” Belfast’s location is ideal for the shipbuilding industry that once made it famous. The Titanic was built here in 1912, at the largest shipyard in the world. Until the Good Friday Agreement of 1998 was reached, the worst of Ireland’s “troubles” was experienced in Belfast, which suffered almost half the conflict’s resulting deaths. Since that time, however, Belfast’s city center has emerged into an attractive pedestrian-oriented environment with street musicians and the like, and a revitalized river front.

20.07.24
Rothesay, Isle of Bute
08:00
17:00

Rothesay, standing along the Firth of Clyde, presents the visitor with a combination of illustrious gardens and grand architecture. The magnificent ruins of Rothesay Castle, which date from the 13th century, are what most people visualize when they think of a medieval castle. With a drawbridge, encircling moat, immense circular curtain wall and tall stone towers, Rothesay is unique in Scotland for its circular plan. The ruins of St Blane’s Chapel, a 6th century monastery, sit atop a hill with views over the Sound of Bute. For true elegance, visit the country estate of Mount Stuart House with its colonnaded Marble Hall and extraordinary Marble Chapel. Built in the late 1870’s in the Gothic Revivalist style, it was constructed of reddish-brown stone and houses a library of 25,000 books.

The Ardencraig Gardens, sitting atop Canada Hill, feature a walled garden and exotic aviary. Ascog Hall Fernery, located on the grounds of a baronial-style house from 1844, is a beautiful garden with the oldest ferns in Britain.

21.07.24
Oban, UK
08:00
17:00

Oban is a small town on the west coast of Scotland. The site began as a small fishing outpost and has been occupied as such for literally thousands of years. Rural in its roots, the modern-day village of Oban grew around the famed whisky distillery founded in 1794. Renowned for its 14-year-old malt whisky, the Oban distillery has become a tourist attraction, drawing many visitors to the area. The quiet, rural feel of Oban is responsible for the abundance of wildlife within the town boundaries. Here grey seals can be spotted swimming in the harbor or resting along the shore. A wide variety of land and seabirds are found throughout the area. On occasion dolphins and river otters also visit. A beautiful balance exists between this small town and the natural environment surrounding it, where the sounds of nature mingle with the melody of the streets.

22.07.24
Ullapool
08:00
17:00

Ullapool is a village of around 1,500 inhabitants in Ross and Cromarty, Scottish Highlands, located around 45 miles north-west of Inverness. Despite its small size it is the largest settlement for many miles around, and an important port and tourist destination.

23.07.24
At Sea
24.07.24
Newhaven
08:00
21:00

Newhaven, about two miles north of the Edinburgh city center on the Firth of Forth, is an historic harbor from which to visit Scotland’s stately capital. Once an important fishing and shipbuilding community, Newhaven is a conservation area with unique vernacular architecture using a forestair to access a house’s first floor living area, above a ground floor traditionally used for storing nets. The town’s Victoria Primary School is the oldest operating primary school in the United Kingdom. Edinburgh is perennially listed among the most attractive and interesting cities in Europe. Its patrician skyline bristles with steeples and spires between the Castle Rock and Carlton Hill. Both the Old Town and New Town are inscribed by UNESCO as World Heritage Sites. The city’s seven hills guard an immensely rich heritage of architectural and historic buildings, districts and streets to delight visitors. Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Palace, the Royal Mile and the Princes Street Gardens area are world-renowned. The noble Scottish National Parliament, City Chambers, Law Courts and Scottish National Gallery are equally prestigious sights. A university city, Edinburgh nurtures a vibrant arts and cultural community, a spirited nightlife and a burgeoning culinary scene. A year-round agenda of celebrated festivals add further appeal for visitors.

25.07.24
Newcastle Tyne, UK
08:00
17:00

Newcastle upon Tyne, clinging to the north bank of the River Tyne, grew around the Roman settlement Pons Aelius and was named after the castle built here in 1080 by William the Conqueror’s eldest son, Robert Curthose. The port developed in the 16th century, quickly becoming one of the world’s largest shipbuilding centers. Newcastle harbors a spirited mix of heritage and urban sophistication.

Among its ultra-modern structures, is the beautiful refined curve of the Gateshead Millennium suspension bridge, one of seven major bridges that cross The Tyne. The modern reflective, spherical-profile of the Sage Gateshead Concert Hall contrasts greatly with the distinguished vertical columns of the traditional-style Theatre Royal, located in Grainger Town, the historic center of Newcastle.

26.07.24
Great Yarmouth, England, United Kingdom
09:00
18:00
27.07.24
Dover, UK
07:00
17:00

Crossing the English Channel from continental Europe to Great Britain, the first view of England is the milky-white strip of land called the White Cliffs of Dover. As you get closer, the coastline unfolds before you in all its striking beauty. White chalk cliffs with streaks of black flint rise straight from the sea to a height of 350’ (110 m).

Numerous archaeological finds reveal people were present in the area during the Stone Age. Yet the first record of Dover is from Romans, who valued its close proximity to the mainland. A mere 21 miles (33 km) separate Dover from the closest point in France. A Roman-built lighthouse in the area is the tallest Roman structure still standing in Britain. The remains of a Roman villa with the only preserved Roman wall mural outside of Italy are another unique survivor from ancient times which make Dover one of a kind.

28.07.24
At Sea
29.07.24
Douglas Harbour
12:00
23:59

Douglas is the capital of the Isle of Man. Mann, as it is also called, is a British Crown Dependency, with its own parliament and postage stamps (a popular souvenir). Here visitors can sample means of transport ranging from horse-drawn trams, to steam trains and the high-speed motorcycles that compete in the renowned Isle of Man TT races. In summer the town maintains much of the seaside resort charm of an earlier period, including the Victorian-era Grand Union Camera Obscura, now restored for your amusement.

30.07.24
Tobermory, Scotland, UK
08:00
16:00

Tiny, tidy Tobermory welcomes you to the Isle of Mull, largest of the Inner Hebrides. The colorful town is curved around its harbor, and the Mull Museum is a good place to start discovering more about the island, as well as its maritime and crofting background. Iona Abbey is an atmospheric relic of ancient times, with a Gothic and Romanesque nave. Nearby Duart Castle is one of the oldest inhabited castle in Ireland, the seat of Clan MacClean. The central keep was built in 1360. Glengorm Castle is scenically situated overlooking the sea and the distant Outer Hebrides. Retire to the small Tobermory Distillery, one of Scotland’s earliest, for a taste of single malt whisky, then keep an eye out for a glimpse of the magnificent white-tailed sea eagles recently re-introduced on the island.

31.07.24
At Sea
01.08.24
Djupivogur, Iceland
08:00
16:00

Djúpivogur is a very small, quaint town of some 456 people, located in East Iceland in Berufjörður fjord. Towering, pyramid-shaped Mount Búlandstindur dominates the landscape, rising to 3,510’ (1,069 m). It is a place of unspoiled nature, with quiet lagoons and a tranquil harbor populated by colorful fishing boats. The area is well-known for the diversity of birdlife, especially in nearby Búlandsnes Bird Sanctuary where most of Iceland’s bird species can be observed.

Time seems to flow more slowly here, because the residents have chosen a much different lifestyle, enriched with opportunities to observe their natural surroundings. Djúpivogur is a creative community, displaying its local arts and crafts in workshops and galleries. The Eggs of Merry Bay, ‘Eggin í Gleðivík,’ is a large outdoor art installation by renowned Icelandic artist Sigurður Guðmundsson. It consists of 34 large sculpted stone eggs representing the 34 bird species found in the vicinity. Located only a kilometre from the town center, it makes an easy and pleasant stroll along the shore.

02.08.24
Heimaey
08:00
17:00
03.08.24
Reykjavik, Iceland
07:00

Warmed by the Gulf Stream as well as by highly active thermal hot springs and volcanoes, Iceland is somewhat misnamed. While it is a stark and barren country with three huge areas of glaciers, one theory is that early Norsemen sought to mislead other potential settlers by giving a pleasant name to fierce, inhospitable Greenland, and a forbidding name to the imminently habitable Iceland. Irish monks and hermits established themselves here in the 8th century, but left a century later when the pagan Norsemen arrived. Europe’s first Parliament of General Assembly, the Althing, was established in the year 930 and still functions as the legislative body, although it was suspended by the Danes at the end of the 18th century and not reconvened until 1843. Reykjavik was the site picked by the island’s first permanent resident, Ingolfur Arnarson in 874, and is home to more than half of the island’s total population. The world’s northernmost capital, Reykjavik is proud of its virtual lack of air pollution. Both electrical power and home heating are derived from the geothermal activity on the island. The city’s large swimming pools are always warm, and in the countryside exotic fruits such as grapes and bananas are cultivated in greenhouses made cozy with the help of underground hot springs.

Seabourn Sojourn enchants her guests with an array of public areas scaled to encourage a relaxed sociability. One of the most unusual features of Seabourn Sojourn and her sisters is Seabourn Square, an ingenious “living room” that replaces the traditional cruise ship lobby with a welcoming lounge filled with easy chairs, sofas and cocktail tables; making it more inviting and relaxing on a small ship cruise. An enclave in its center houses knowledgeable concierges discreetly seated at individual desks.

In-Suite Service
Patio Grill
Sky Bar
The Colonnade
The Restaurant
The Restaurant 2

Beauty Salon
Facial Treatments
Massage
Sauna
Spa
Swimming Pool
Thalassotherapy Pool
Whirlpool

Gym
Sports Deck

Cabin

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